Latest Health News, Plus Covid-19 Update.

This week’s health tip will touch upon the latest health news headlines. 

 

Processed meat served at fast food restaurants, such as meat, chicken and fish do not just contain meat.  Additives such as textured vegetable protein and soy product are paced in the meats to make them cheaper to manufacture.

 

Speaking of processed foods, ultra-processed foods have been shown to increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBS).  “Ultra-processed foods are void of nutrients, full of additives, and impact the brain in such a way that the individual consuming them may find it hard to control portions,” Kirkpatrick told Healthline. “There’s a reason why we can’t put a bag of potato chips down but can easily stop eating broccoli after one serving.”  Diets high in processed foods are also associated with diabetes, high blood pressure, obesity and early death.

 

Inflammation in the body is a marker for and sign for early disease.  The nutrition trend is to eat anti-inflammatory foods like ginger, pineapple, turmeric and omega 3 fats.  A new study suggests that fermented foods should be added to the list.  Foods such as yogurt, kefir, fermented cottage cheese, tofu, sauerkraut, kimchi and kombucha tea have been shown to increase microbial activity in the gut and lower inflammation in the body.

 

Regular aerobic exercise improves memory and lowers risk of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

 

Sunscreens containing benzene are being recalled for the long term cancer risks.  Neutrogena and Aveeno are voluntary pulling sunscreens from the store shelves.  Check your products ingredients for benzene.

 

Swimming for exercise improves mental health.  Regular swimming has shown positive changes in peoples mood and feelings of well-being.  I am sure this applies to all exercise.

 

Antibiotics save lives.  But the unnecessary use of antibiotics over time can lead to the creation of supergerms, antibiotic resistant bacteria.  Antibiotics are useless against viruses – common cold, etc.  They only kill bacteria.  Taking antibiotics for viruses is useless.  A new study finds that antibiotic use over time can also lead to colorectal cancer.  Another good reason to avoid the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

 

10 ways to help with anxiety naturally.  1. Exercise 2. Meditation 3. Relaxation exercises 4. Writing  5. Time Management strategies 6. Aromatherapy 7. CBD oil 8. Herbal teas 9. Herbal supplements 10. Time with animals.

 

3 Tips for preventing heat stroke.  1. Stay hydrated.  Increase your water intake in the summer months.  2.  Rest avoid exercise outdoors in the peak heat hours between 10 am and 5 pm.  3. Hang out in a cool environment. Obviously, air conditioning works.  No AC?  Look for shady spots. Spray yourself with cool water mist.  Place a wet towel or tee shirt over the back of your neck.  Also, do you know why fans work or fanning yourself?  Not because of lowering the air temperature, but because they cause air movement over the skin, evaporating perspiration, thus lowering body temperature.

 

 

COVID-19 and Me:   The New York Times recently published an investigative article on how chiropractors were dividing the profession over the covid-19 vaccine. I was contacted by the reporter to be interviewed for the article. The NY Times reporter discovered my articles that are published on my blog, emailed to my patients and printed weekly in the Brigantine Times.  The reporter sent me a list of questions to answer for her research. Once I received the questions, I quickly realized that the article had an obvious slant to it and would not be completely unbiased and objective reporting.  Instead of answering her questions, I sent the sources of my information that pertained to the reporter’s concerns.  My sources are medical and science journals that I use to report on new information or research concerning Covid-19.

 

The few chiropractors she featured were what one would consider as having views that have not changed with the progression of the profession.  The reporter misrepresented  information from 1895 when chiropractic was in its infancy to make her point about the profession’s beliefs. Ignoring the 125 years of advances in chiropractic science and research. The article was published last week.  And yes, it did slant heavily towards chiropractors with controversial views.  The reporter included me in her article as well.  The reporter tried to make me come off as controversial and misleading, but I fell she is the one who came off as disingenuous. 

 

Here is the portion of the article concerning me:  “A New Jersey chiropractor, J. Zimmerman, has routinely cited figures on his blog from the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System — a federal database to which anyone can report health problems after vaccination — and suggested that vaccines caused the problems reported. He did not mention the C.D.C.’s disclaimer — “A report to VAERS does not mean that the vaccine caused the adverse event, only that the adverse event occurred sometime after vaccination” — in his posts until after The New York Times emailed him questions about his use of VAERS.  Dr. Zimmerman did not answer those questions.” 

 

First, as far as the CDC disclaimer goes, I didn’t know the CDC had a disclaimer printed in the adverse event reporting system.  Once the reporter let me know there was one, I have included the disclaimer in every article.  In the irony department, the CDC disclaimer has changed on their website over the last month or two.  The disclaimer that the reporter sites above is nowhere to be found on the reporting systems home page.  The disclaimer I use cannot be found on the CDC reporting systems home page.  The new disclaimer is “The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database contains information on unverified reports of adverse events (illnesses, health problems and/or symptoms) following immunization with US-licensed vaccines. Reports are accepted from anyone and can be submitted electronically.  VAERS accepts reports of adverse events and reactions that occur following vaccination. Healthcare providers, vaccine manufacturers, and the public can submit reports to VAERS. While very important in monitoring vaccine safety, VAERS reports alone cannot be used to determine if a vaccine caused or contributed to an adverse event or illness. The reports may contain information that is incomplete, inaccurate, coincidental, or unverifiable. Most reports to VAERS are voluntary, which means they are subject to biases. This creates specific limitations on how the data can be used scientifically. Data from VAERS reports should always be interpreted with these limitations in mind.”  As you can see, the new disclaimers much more in-depth and way longer than mine or the reporters. I will not make assumptions why the CDC changed the disclaimer.

Secondly, the reporter ends the blurb on me by adding that I did not answer her questions.  The reporter fails to inform you that I sent sources for all of the questions asked.  Interestingly enough, the topics that I sent sources to the reporter on, never made it to the article. There was no mention of any of my Covid-19 updates or vaccination articles that I have written in my newsletters and blogs.

So, basically, my part in the article says that I share statistics from the CDC Vaccine Adverse Reporting System.  All true.

 

Covid-19 Vaccine Informed Consent. The purpose of my sharing the CDC Vaccine Adverse Reporting System statistics is not to dissuade you from getting the vaccine. It is your decision as to whether or not you get the vaccine.  I have never implied the vaccine does not work and does not prevent severe cases of Covid-19.  My purpose is to present you with information that is not heard on the news. The news only tells one side of the story. And as far as the vaccine goes, the news tells us to get vaccinated and that the vaccine prevents spread of Covid-19 and will also prevent severe cases of Covid-19 while protecting you and your family. The other side of the story, the one we do not hear, is that there is some degree of risk in getting the vaccine. Albeit statistically small when compared to the overall numbers vaccinated, but the risk exists.  People do get reactions.  Some minor, some severe.  Some deadly.  It is up to you decided how to proceed and assess your personal Covid-19 risk compared to a vaccine risk. You cannot make an objective and fact based decision if you are not given all the information.  Thus the reason for me sharing the CDC stats.  An additional reason for me sharing, is that as a health care practitioner, I have patients that tell me their own reaction events and events from there family. Again, statistically small, but they happen.  My patients have told me cases of blood clotting, Bell’s Palsy, severe shock, heart issues etc.  I have even had patients tell me that they had healthy family members die within 3 dies of the vaccination (three people).  This is why I share.  Again, not to dissuade you, but to give you informed consent.  Just like every drug and medication advertised on television, radio or print media, the potential adverse reactions must be known.

Covid-19 Update:  337 million doses of the vaccine have been given out.  Atlantic County has 127 new cases over the last two week period, up from 88 cases the prior 2 weeks. Atlantic County has had ZERO deaths in the last 2 week period, down from 2. The Delta variant of Covid-19 has a higher spread rate than “our” regular Covid-19.  The flu spread rate is 3 to 1.  It was suggested that Covid-19 at its peak had a 7 to 1 spread rate. The Delta variant spread rate was suggested to be 9 to 1.  Doctors have gone on record as saying the Delta variant spreads faster, but is not more dangerous or deadlier than the regular Covid-19 virus.

Vaccine Informed Consent Information:  Vaccine related deaths jumped up by 1900 this week.  Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System data released 7/17/21 by the CDC showed a total of 463,457 reports of adverse reactions from all age groups following COVID vaccines, including 10,991 deaths and 48,385 serious injuries between Dec. 14, 2020 and July 17, 2021.  VAERS is the primary government-funded system for reporting adverse vaccine reactions in the U.S. Reports submitted to VAERS require further investigation before a causal relationship can be confirmed. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) database contains information on unverified reports of adverse events following immunization. Reports are accepted from anyone and can be submitted electronically.   337 million vaccine doses have been administered.  According to the CDC, as of July 17th 2021,   10,991 fully vaccinated people have been hospitalized or died from Covid-19 infection.  This week’s data for 12- to 17-year-olds show 14,003 total adverse events, including 866 rated as serious and 14 reported deaths among 12- to 17-year-olds.  2,040 cases of anaphylaxis, 377 reports of myocarditis and 65 reports of blood clotting disorders in the 12-17 year old age group. This week’s data for pregnancy /prenatal vaccination shows pregnant women had 2,857 adverse events reported including 1072 reports of miscarriage or premature birth. As of July 17th, 337 million doses of the vaccine were administered. Based on the number of vaccines given, statistically speaking the adverse reaction rate is low, but when compared to safety records of all other vaccines manufactured and administered over the last 30 years, Covid-19 vaccine now exceeds the reported death rate of more than 70 vaccines combined.

 

Prenatal, Pregnancy and Chiropractic Information:  Despite 1000's of pregnant women receiving the Covid-19 vaccination and told that the vaccination is safe for them (see above CDC vaccine reaction stats on pregnancy), Moderna drug company is now starting a 1000 women covid-19 vaccine trial to help reassure the population of the vaccine's safety for prenatal care and pregnancy.  This study will last 21 months not the 10 weeks the last study lasted.  Any pregnant women want to sign -up?  

Author
Dr J. Zimmerman, Chiropractor Dr. Zimmerman is a practicing chiropractor from Galloway, NJ with 30 years of chiropractic practice.

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